Testicular cancer or testicular cancer: symptoms, treatment

Testicular cancer/testicular cancer is a malignant tumor of the testicle. Testicular cancer is not common, but it is the most common type of cancer in men between the ages of twenty and forty-five. The risk of testicular cancer is much greater with an undescended testicle than with a normal position in the scrotum. What are the causes and symptoms? How is testicular cancer treated and what is the prognosis?

Article content

  • Testicle or testicle
  • Abnormalities of the reproductive organs
  • Testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Forms of testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Causes of testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Symptoms of testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Diagnosis testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Treatment of testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Prognosis testicular cancer or testicular cancer
  • Sexual functioning and sperm freezing

Testicle or testicle

Testicle, also called testicle, testicle or testis, is part of the male sexual organs. The testes often descend before birth, from the abdominal cavity via the inguinal canal to the scrotum. The epididymis is located at the top and back of the testicle. The testes hang in the scrotum on a spermatic cord. It consists of the vas deferens, blood vessels, nerves, muscle fibers and connective tissue. From puberty onwards, the testes produce testosterone : the male sex hormone. Testosterone promotes the development of secondary and tertiary sexual characteristics: beard growth, male hair, deeper voice. Sperm cells also grow in the testes. They end up in the epididymis through tubes.

Abnormalities of the reproductive organs

The reproductive organs are largely located outside the abdominal cavity. This involves the penis, scrotum and testes. Deviations are therefore often identified at an early stage. A man should not let shame prevent him from reporting complaints to the doctor. The fact is that most abnormalities can be

resolved quickly through treatment.

Testicular cancer or testicular cancer

A malignant growth in the testicle . Testicular cancer mainly occurs in men between the ages of twenty and forty-five. Sometimes it runs in the family. Lifestyle is not a significant factor. It is a rare disease, but one of the most common forms of cancer in men between the ages mentioned above. Important to know: it is one of the easiest types of cancer to cure. However, it must be discovered in time! If this form of cancer is not addressed, it can spread to the lymph nodes and eventually to other places in the body. This can result in death. Testicular cancer usually occurs in one testicle . Most tumors of the testicle develop in the cells of the ball that produce sperm.

Forms of testicular cancer or testicular cancer

There are several forms of testicular cancer. Seminoma , with cells resembling primitive sperm cells, is the most common (especially in men between thirty-five and forty-five years of age) and generally has the best outlook. The other forms are usually summarized with the term non-seminoma.

Causes of testicular cancer or testicular cancer

The causes are not known, but there are factors that increase the risk of testicular cancer. For example, if the disease runs in the family or if someone has an undescended testicle. An undescended testicle is a condition in which the testicle has not descended into the scrotum before birth.

Symptoms of testicular cancer or testicular cancer

It is wise to check the testicles regularly, then you will notice the symptoms sooner. If you notice the changes below, make an appointment with your doctor immediately.

  • A hard lump about the size of a pea;
  • The lump does not hurt;
  • The size of the testicle has changed;
  • The observable structure of the testicle has undergone a change;
  • A vague pain in the scrotum;
  • Very occasionally, a person suddenly feels a very sharp pain in the affected testicle;
  • A tired feeling for no apparent reason.

Diagnosis testicular cancer or testicular cancer

  • Physical examination;
  • Echo;
  • Blood tests to see if cancer is present;
  • If a tumor is discovered, more tests will be done to see whether or not there are metastases: extensive blood tests, CT scan, MRI scan.

Treatment of testicular cancer or testicular cancer

If testicular cancer is diagnosed, the affected testicle will be removed through surgery. If there are no metastases, no further treatment may be necessary. However, the blood must be checked regularly to ensure that there are no metastases. If the cancer has spread, further treatment will be required. This may involve surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. If the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes in the abdomen, these lymph nodes are sometimes removed through surgery or chemotherapy is given. Seminomas can be treated most easily by surgery and radiation compared to the other types of testicular cancer.

Prognosis testicular cancer or testicular cancer

The outlook depends on the type of testicular cancer and the stage in the disease process in which the cancer was discovered. Testicular cancer can often be cured. About four out of ten tumors are seminomas and the survival rate for seminomas is more than nine in ten. For metastases it is about eight in ten.

Sexual functioning and sperm freezing

  • Surgical removal of a testicle is unlikely to affect sexual function or fertility if these were normal before the cancer developed.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation can reduce sperm production and affect fertility temporarily or permanently. So always be well informed before the treatment. It is possible to have seminal fluid containing sperm frozen before the treatment.