Condition: Athlete’s foot

This name is actually very confusing, because it is not eczema but a fungal infection between the toes. You can contract this in damp rooms, saunas, in the bathroom, etc.

Contents

  • Athlete’s foot
  • How to prevent?
  • Diagnosis
  • Therapy
  • Treatments table

Athlete’s foot

Athlete’s foot is also called athlete’s foot. About 10 to 15% of adults will experience this in their lives. It is a highly contagious condition and it is therefore very important that you wear slippers when showering at a sports club in a communal shower room so as not to transmit or contract the fungal infection. Athlete’s foot can be recognized by a red and scaly spot (sometimes with blisters) between the toes.

How to prevent?

  • Wear slippers in public shower rooms, changing rooms and saunas
  • After showering, dry thoroughly between the toes
  • If you have perspiring feet, treat with drying powder
  • Wear good moisture-absorbing socks
  • Wear clean socks every day
  • Wear well-fitting ventilated leather shoes
  • If you share shoes with others, put anti-fungal powder in them

Diagnosis

You can often tell whether it is athlete’s foot or not. But you can also have it examined by a microscopic test. The dander is then examined. Sometimes it has to be sent to a microbiological laboratory.

Therapy

If you have athlete’s foot, go to your doctor and ask for an ointment. The doctor will then give you an anti-fungal cream or tincture. The treatment will have to continue for some time once the athlete’s foot has gone away. A re-infection is still possible because you can come into contact with it again.

Treatments table

Symptoms

Positive result %

Neutral result %

Psoriasis (chronic skin disease)

80%

20%

Eczema (skin disease)

70%

30%

Leg edema (fluid retention)

100%

0%

Lymphedema (fluid retention)

95%

5%

Lymph gland (functioning/detoxification)

95%

5%

Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating)

90%

10%

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  • Eczema ‘dermatitis’