Hormone ointment and its use

A hormone ointment is also called a corticosteroid ointment. Some skin diseases where hormone ointments are commonly used include eczema and psoriasis. There are four classes of hormone ointments. Hormone ointment is not just an ointment to spread around. Unfortunately, hormone ointments also have side effects.

Hormone ointment

A hormone ointment is also called a corticosteroid ointment. Corticosteroids are the imitation of a hormone that is normally produced by the body. These hormones are adrenocortical hormones and are produced by the adrenal glands. One of these hormones that the adrenal cortex produces is glucocorticoid. These, among other things, suppress inflammation. If there is a deficiency of this, inflammatory reactions of the skin quickly arise. To combat these inflammations of the skin, a hormone ointment is prescribed that contains the chemical variant of these hormones.

Skin diseases

Some skin diseases where hormone ointments are commonly used include eczema and psoriasis. Eczema is an itchy inflammation of the skin. Psoriasis is an accelerated growth of skin cells, leaving a thick red layer of old skin cells. A hormone ointment appears to be effective for both skin diseases.

Strengths

There are four classes of hormone ointments.

  • class 1: Mild corticosteroids. Often used for facial skin diseases.
  • class 2: Fairly strong corticosteroids. Often used in children, such as for eczema.
  • class 3: Strong corticosteroids. Often used for psoriasis. Not for use on the face.
  • class 4: Very strong corticosteroids: For psoriasis or very persistent skin conditions. Very strong for temporary use.

The use of hormone ointment

Hormone ointment is not just an ointment to spread around. Classes 3 and 4 in particular should be used in moderation. Apply the hormone ointment thinly and do not use it more often than prescribed. The correct amount is one fingertip of the hormone ointment. One should also not be afraid to use a hormone ointment, as it will not work if used too little. The ointment is usually used once or twice a day. There is also always a period of rest after using hormone ointment. This means that the hormone ointment is applied for three days in a row, after which there is a period of rest of a number of days. During these days, hormone ointment is not applied, but with a maintenance ointment such as a Vaseline ointment. Do not use the strong classes of hormone ointment on the face, but only on arms, legs and torso. Also, do not lend hormone ointment or use hormone ointment from another person.

Also use a maintenance ointment together with the hormone ointment. This is often a greasy ointment, such as a Vaseline ointment. The maintenance ointment should be used daily, several times a day. A maintenance ointment keeps the skin oily and prevents it from drying out too much. Unfortunately, a maintenance ointment does not cure, but serves as support.

Side effects

Unfortunately, hormone ointments also have side effects. If the hormone ointment is used incorrectly, the side effects can even have adverse effects on the skin. These side effects occur after frequent use of hormone ointments. One should then consider using a hormone ointment for months to years. An important side effect is that the skin becomes thinner. This makes the skin tear more easily and bruises occur more easily. Multiple blood vessels can develop in the face, which are visible from the outside. Unfortunately, the damage done does not repair itself, even after stopping the use of hormone ointment. Anyone who applies large amounts of heavy hormone ointment can imagine that it is absorbed into the body through the skin. This can cause edema or increased blood pressure. Diabetes or osteoporosis can also develop. In children, growth can be stunted. Children who use a lot of hormone ointments should therefore always be monitored for growth.